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Fun

How to Play a Very Fun Game and Get Rid of Your English Teachers

by Owen Fourie

Six English teachers

sitting on the wall;

six English teachers

sitting on the wall

heard Johnny say,

Let’s have some fun.

No problem here;

see, there are

six English teachers

sitting on the wall.

******

Six English teachers

sitting on the wall;

six English teachers

sitting on the wall

heard Jimmy say,

Let’s have a fun party.

One English teacher

fell from the wall.

Five English teachers

sitting on the wall.

*****

Five English teachers

sitting on the wall;

five English teachers

sitting on the wall

heard Jenni say,

Let’s have a funner party.

Another English teacher

fell from the wall.

Four English teachers

sitting on the wall.

****

Four English teachers

sitting on the wall;

four English teachers

sitting on the wall

heard Jackie say,

Let’s have the funnest party.

Another English teacher

fell from the wall.

Three English teachers

sitting on the wall.

***

Three English teachers

sitting on the wall;

three English teachers

sitting on the wall

heard Julie say,

See how he funs at the party.

Another English teacher

fell from the wall.

Two English teachers

sitting on the wall.

**

Two English teachers

sitting on the wall;

two English teachers

sitting on the wall

heard Jamey say,

I see him funning at the party?

Another English teacher

fell from the wall.

One English teacher

sitting on the wall.

*

One English teacher

sitting on the wall;

one English teacher

sitting on the wall

heard Jerry say,

I saw how he funned at the party.

That one English teacher

fell from the wall.

No English teachers

sitting on the wall.

🙁

Fun as a noun

While you are having such fun, those poor English teachers are not having a funner time. What is their problem?

Their problem is that there is no fun beyond the noun fun.

No teachers fell off the wall when Johnny said, “Let’s have some fun.” He used fun as a noun, so that was fine.

Fun as an adjective

The problem started when Jimmy said, “Let’s have a fun party.” He used fun as an adjective. Dictionaries allow this for informal use, but many teachers don’t like such fun at all.

When Jenni thought they could do better by having a funner party than the last one they attended, she, too, used an adjective allowed by dictionaries for informal use, but many teachers still have a problem.

Jackie was keen to see them have the funnest party ever. She also used an adjective, which is fine if it is used informally, but teachers will not allow this in your essays.

Fun as a verb

Julie seemed to break new ground when she used the word funs as a verb, but this is also in the dictionaries and is used informally. Teachers will not allow it in your essays or formal speech, though.

Jamey and Jerry continued the barrage of verbs with funning and funned to get rid of their English teachers who can’t tolerate such usage.

To act in a joking or playful manner would define the verbs funs, funning, and funned.

You can still have fun

Permit me to leave you with this word of advice: In your formal writing and speaking, be sure to use fun as a noun and leave its use as an adjective and a verb for your informal situations.

Now, I have to attend to my wounds from falling off that high wall. It wasn’t a “very fun” time. Ouch! “Very fun” does not sound right to me. I’ll stick to using fun only as a noun.

—–

If you have any points or questions about the use of “fun” as an adjective or a verb, please comment here. Your comments, observations, and questions are welcome.

Here are more articles to help you with English words, grammar, and essay writing.

Copyright © 2012 by English Essay Writing Tips www.englishessaywritingtips.com


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